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What Is The Best Way To Emancipate Ourselves From State Control? [Jan. 4th, 2007|02:34 am]
anti_state

trystancellan
Or in other words . . . how do we smash the state?

Is it through a.) propaganda by the deed b.) trying to raise awareness of the illegitimacy of the state or c.) both.

Personaly, I don't think most people are ready for a revolution yet . . . certainly if they do not know what it will mean for them, and I think using violence (esp if it is on a small scale) alienates anarchists from everyone else . . .



Discuss?
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(no subject) [Dec. 22nd, 2006|10:43 am]
anti_state
panhellenios
Law-Enforcement Socialism
By Anthony Gregory

[EXCERPT]

Every year, more prisons are built, more money is funneled to police departments, more criminal law is written and yet domestic crime remains a major problem.

Explanations abound as to why this is. The Left blames the economic system for fostering inequality, which supposedly causes crime. The Right says the police have their hands tied by political correctness. Libertarians typically argue that the government wastes precious time and resources on victimless crime and has insufficient tools remaining to deal with the genuine predators.

There is a more fundamental explanation, however, which makes logic out of the entire mess but is almost never voiced: Socialism. Law enforcement agencies, courts, prisons, legislative bodies — all of the key institutions that are supposed to produce justice are owned and maintained by the state.
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(no subject) [Dec. 15th, 2006|07:05 am]
anti_state
panhellenios
Bush’s Torture Ticking Time Bomb: Sins of Commission
By James Bovard

[EXCERPT]

Have Republicans become the party of torture, secret prisons, and indefinite detention? In his speech last month on signing the Military Commissions Act, President Bush declared that the bill “sends a clear message… We will never back down from the threats to our freedom.” “Rough interrogation” (a.k.a. torture) in the name of freedom may be Bush’s clearest ideological legacy.

Bush endlessly reminds listeners that “the U.S. does not torture” and that “torture is not an American value.” But “What is torture?” is the Bush version of the Pontius Pilate question. Bush appears to be using the definition of torture crafted by Justice Department official John Yoo: if detainees weren’t maimed or killed, they weren’t tortured. And the Justice Department acts as if, even if detainees are killed during interrogations, it is best to treat the deaths as harmless errors.
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(no subject) [Dec. 14th, 2006|03:07 pm]
anti_state
panhellenios
U.S. Mint Moves to Ban Penny Melting
By Quiana Burns

[EXCERPT]

Find a penny, pick it up, and all day you'll have good luck.

Find a penny, melt it, and you could get locked up.

Effective today, the U.S. Mint has implemented an interim rule that makes it illegal to melt nickels and pennies, or to export them in mass quantities.

With the soaring price of copper, a melted-down penny or nickel is now worth more than it would be in its regular state at face value.
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(no subject) [Dec. 14th, 2006|08:18 am]
anti_state
panhellenios
Who Makes Foreign Policy?
By Ron Paul

[EXCERPT]

The Iraq Study Group released its report last week, giving the president several recommendations to consider in prosecuting the war. Similarly, the incoming Democratic leaders in Congress promise to urge the President to take a new course in Iraq. Meanwhile, one newly elected member of Congress was asked on national television about the Iraq war. She responded by saying she had no real opinion, and that foreign policy was “up to the president.”

In each instance, it is assumed that the president will make Iraq policy. I’m not talking about the details of actual military operations in Iraq; I’m talking about the broader policy questions of how long our troops will stay, how many will stay, and how victory will be defined.

The media, Congress, and the American public all seem to have accepted something that is patently untrue: namely, that foreign policy is the domain of the president and not Congress. This is absolutely not the case and directly contrary to what our founding fathers wanted.
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(no subject) [Dec. 13th, 2006|03:35 pm]
anti_state
panhellenios
A Generation Is All They Need
By Kevin Haggerty

[EXCERPT]

By the time my four-year-old son is swathed in the soft flesh of old age, he will likely find it unremarkable that he and almost everyone he knows will be permanently implanted with a microchip. Automatically tracking his location in real time, it will connect him with databases monitoring and recording his smallest behavioural traits.
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(no subject) [Dec. 13th, 2006|10:07 am]
anti_state
panhellenios
Robbing Parents to Pay Teachers
By Alan Caruba

[EXCERPT]

It is an act of thievery to take money to provide goods or services and then fail to do so. Our nation’s schools have become a great criminal conspiracy, promising to educate our children, but more often producing “graduates” without even the most basic skills, let alone a useful, wider body of knowledge.
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(no subject) [Dec. 12th, 2006|04:11 pm]
anti_state
panhellenios
A Century of War
By John V. Denson

[EXCERPT]

The most accurate description of the twentieth century is "The War and Welfare Century." This century was the bloodiest in all history. More than 170 million people were killed by governments with ten million being killed in World War I and fifty million killed in World War II. In regard to the fifty million killed in World War II, it is significant that nearly 70 percent were innocent civilians, mainly as a result of the bombing of cities by Great Britain and America.
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(no subject) [Dec. 12th, 2006|06:56 am]
anti_state
panhellenios
Worst. Meeting. Ever!
By Stefan Molyneux

[EXCERPT]

In my role as a business consultant, I am often asked to provide solutions to highly complex problems. Recently, a large, politically well-connected agricultural business paid me a fortune to provide them with a five-year plan on how to best allocate their assets, capital and human resources in order to maximize profitability. The complexity of the business challenges involved were overwhelming, and I almost despaired of being able to provide them with a solution. The night before my big presentation, however, I suddenly remembered a central lesson I had learned in my political science classes. Armed with inspiration, I scribbled down a complete and total six-step solution, slept well, and presented my answer at the Board of Directors meeting the next morning.
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(no subject) [Dec. 11th, 2006|03:49 pm]
anti_state
panhellenios
A Healthy Dose of Anarchy
By Neille Ilel

[EXCERPT]

I first heard about Common Ground in an email from my friend Jeff, a New York bohemian who frequented underground art parties and halfway legal street events. It’s fair to say that many of the people who organized and attended those events were of a type. They had odd jobs and even odder side projects; they made their own clothes, and it showed. And they threw really good parties.

So when I learned some of the same people were helping organize a relief project in New Orleans, I was both fascinated and skeptical. When I poked around further and learned that many were alumni of Burning Man and the Rainbow Gathering, two of the nation’s biggest, strangest counterculture festivals, I was even more fascinated and even more skeptical. Could a bunch of middle- and upper-middle-class kids, many of them fresh from “alternative” experiences, connect with poor, churchgoing residents of the South? And if they could, would the experiment affect more than a handful of residents?
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